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Identifying corruption risk

An understanding of where risk lies is fundamental to targeting detection activities.

The figure below illustrates the use of ACLEI’s five approaches to risk assessment. These five approaches—each focussing on a different aspect of corruption risk—are overlayed to identify areas within an agency where one or more risk factors aggregate. This information then may direct detection and deterrence efforts to their best effect.

The figure illustrates the use of ACLEI’s five approaches to risk assessment. These five approaches—each focussing on a different aspect of corruption risk—are overlayed to identify areas within an agency where one or more risk factors aggregate. This information then may direct detection and deterrence efforts to their best effect. 

The diagram below provides another way that ACLEI views the aggregation of risk – the confluence of external and internal risk from sources ranging from global to local.

The diagram provides another way that ACLEI views the aggregation of risk – the confluence of external and internal risk from sources ranging from global to local.

ACLEI has developed the following framework to supplement corruption-risk mapping processes and to inform intervention strategies.

Approach Key questions (examples)
Commodity approach What asset(s) are you protecting from corrupt use? What in your control is of value to a corruptor?
  • sensitive information, such as planned law enforcement activity, or law enforcement methods (and how to counter them)
  • decision-making (eg manipulating law enforcement interventions, such as searches)
  • seized property
Location approach Where are the geographical areas or activities of highest corruption risk?
  • movement of goods or passengers
  • intelligence-based investigation (eg human source handling
  • drug law enforcement
  • shared environments, where the risk of detection can be lessened
  • high discretionary power, low supervision, low rotation

What other environments might be less protected from corrupt activity,
and be a weakness in the system?

Corruptor approach Who may want to corrupt your staff, and why?
  • How does their business model work? (bribery, subornation, infiltration, family ties)
  • What profits are involved?
  • What are the law enforcement barriers they need to defeat, in order to conduct illicit activity?
Susceptibility approach Who of your staff may be vulnerable to corruption, if the circumstances allowed?
  • attitudes to integrity
  • workplace dysfunction
  • personal susceptibilities

Who, beyond known individuals, may be involved or recruited?

Vulnerability approach What are the strengths of your systems (that a corrupt officer may need to circumvent)?
What are the weaknesses in your systems (that a corrupt officer could exploit)?